Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia

Archive for the ‘Third Party’ Category

You, fundraising through music

In Donors, Fundraising, Public Relations, Special Events, Third Party on September 16, 2014 at 2:22 pm

gang

A few weeks ago I was contacted by an enthusiastic woman on an event planning mission. She did not beat around the bush, she was efficient and calculated, knowing exactly what she wanted. Would we (the Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia) mind if her band raised money in support of Nova Scotians living with dementia? Well, of course we didn’t mind. We are always enthusiastic when someone wants to help us. The best part of my job is when someone becomes inspired, on their own, and feels so passionate about our cause that they take it upon themselves to raise money on our behalf. I find this to be extremely inspirational and it never ceases to impress me that people are this generous.

Claire Comeau is part of a collection of musicians from Meteghan who come together once or twice a year to put on a show for the community. Each year they pick a charity or two that resonates with them. This year, we were lucky enough to make the cut. When asked why they chose to support us, Comeau answered, “We chose you because some of our parents have had the disease. We are aware that you are there and provide precious help to persons and families afflicted with the disease.”

The band has been performing since approximately 2007. Gerald Theriault is the “mastermind” behind the concerts. Theriault contemplates what the public would like to hear, then makes a decision on what music the band will focus on, and then he recruits the musicians. It is important that the group perform something that is appealing to the public to make them want to buy a ticket and help the fundraiser. This year, the band did and homage to the Bee Gees but in past years they have done: The Beatles, a 60’s Tribute, a 70’s Tribute, The British Invasion I, and The British Invasion II. It will be very interesting to see what they choose to do next.

I want to take a moment to send a special thank you to the talented and generous musicians from the Acadian shore who planned a tremendously successful fundraising event. The following are the musicians who participated in the show:  Gerald Theriault, Brian Amirault, Lloyd Doucet, Don Saulnier, Avery d’Entremont, Simon LeBlanc, Rose Madden, Jennifer McIntosh, Justine Boulianne, Patrice Boulianne, and Claire Comeau.

If YOU are interested in hosting an event in support of the Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia please contact Dawn Boudrot at: dawn.boudrot@asns.ca or call 902-422-7961 ext. 258.

 

YOU, Saying Thank You

In Communications, Donors, Fundraising, national philanthropy day, Public Relations, Relationship Building, thank you, Third Party on August 27, 2014 at 12:46 pm

thank you

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We have blogged about this before. This is not a new concept. Saying thank you is one of the most basic concepts of fundraising. It should be innate to all of us. And while sending thank you cards and letters and including a thank you in every email response is a great habit, what about going further than that.

We have mastered the standard thank you. I worry that it gets lost sometimes. Are the standard thank yous in my emails getting noticed? Are people getting immune to them?

Our Philanthropy Department has been promoting the idea of an “outside the box” thank you for a long time, especially since we started participating in National Philanthropy Day. This is an amazing opportunity to explore if YOU are looking for a cool, new way to say thank you to your supporters. So now that the trend is set in our office and the bar is high. How do you thank someone in a memorable way?

I had an opportunity last night to do one of my most favourite thank yous of all. This thank you isn’t new for us, we have been doing it this way for a few years, but it is so well received and appreciated, that we just can’t mess with it now.

Every January we run a campaign called Forget Me Not Week. This campaign goes out to all universities and colleges in the province as a way to engage the younger generation. The schools compete against each other to raise money and whoever raises the most gets a prize. The prize is our way of saying thank you. For the past decade or so, the winner of the campaign has been the Acadia Axemen football team. They are extremely dedicated to our cause and have carved out a niche for themselves in their community. The team and coaches work extremely hard to win this challenge and it is important to us to do something meaningful for them, after all, we want them to stay engaged.

Working with the coaching staff we help develop a team bonding experience during their preseason training. This is an important time for them to gel as a team, and so giving them an experience that allows them to spend time together off the field is important. This is also a time where they are working extremely hard and don’t have a lot of extra energy to give. As a result we set something up that is relaxing; a private screening of a movie of their choosing.

It is amazing to see how appreciative and thankful the team is to have to this luxury. As students, they appreciate the free entertainment, and as a team they appreciate the opportunity to get to know each other and the coaches.

This also becomes an opportunity for us to say thank you directly to them while they are all together, and explain why what they do is so important to the people of the province.

We could send a hand written card to say thank you that gets tacked up on some bulletin board in the locker room (which we do). But this opportunity gives me face time with the team, gives the coaches a chance to accept a plaque in front of the team and helps me strengthen my relationship with the team. There is nothing like talking to someone in person to fortify a relationship.

It might not be the most outside the box thank you we could ever dream up, but here are some important things to remember: we did something that fit their schedule, we did something that fit their agenda, we did something they enjoy and we got that all-important face time. A true “thank you” success.

YOU, keeping your brain active while fundraising

In Third Party on July 9, 2014 at 12:52 pm

Bridge

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A few weeks ago, Tammy wrote to you about the “Longest Day” Bridge game that the Bridge Studio held in Halifax. Today, let’s talk about a game that was held at the other end of our province, at Bridge Acadien in Yarmouth.

Yves Chartrand from Bridge Acadien, knows that playing bridge is a great way to keep your mind active (in fact it’s not just playing Bridge that helps, it’s also the social aspect of the game. Read more about better brain health here).  Its one of the reasons he signed his club up to be part of the “Longest Day Fundraiser.”

“I applied early to take part in The Longest Day for 2014 since it was going to be on the day that we run our normal games (Saturday) and I believe it is a great charity to pair up with the game of Bridge.  I have read that keeping your brain active may help delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and playing Bridge should definitely qualify as an activity that makes your brain work!”

The “Longest Day” fundraiser takes place on the longest day of the year, June 21. Fundraisers around North America host special events, or challenge themselves/group to do something for up to 12 hours. It could mean that everyone in your office walks a treadmill, one hour at a time, for 12 hours, raising funds to do so to support those living with dementia.

At Bridge Acadien, here is how they spent their day:

“We had a great day with 5 games from 10 am until 10 pm.  We did have a supper break, which was very much appreciated.  I may change the format next year.  it is a lot of work to run all those games without any help.  The highlight was the participation by local players and the amount of food that was brought in by all.  It helped us provide great hospitality and I believe that everybody enjoyed themselves.”

We thank Yves and Bridge Acadien for supporting those in our province, for whom many days, seem like the longest, as they live with dementia.

Do YOU think that your office, organization, club is up to the challenge of spending the Longest Day next  year raising funds for Nova Scotians living with dementia? Let us know in the comments!

In the meantime, maybe YOU are interested in Bridge. Yves wants YOU to know:

“Bridge is a great game. YOU learn communication skills, teamwork, problem solving skills, how to win and lose gracefully and all kinds of math skills.”